See whether your state is one of the cheapest for residential natural gas (all prices in dollars per thousand cubic feet):

StateApril rateStateApril rate
North Dakota6.62Utah7.69
Idaho6.84Wyoming7.79
Montana6.98Minnesota8.07
South Dakota7.17Colorado8.15
Wisconsin7.33Nebraska8.28

Where is natural gas most expensive? Hawaii, where it costs $48.74 per thousand cubic feet. Here are the 10 states where it costs the most:

StateApril rateStateApril rate
Hawaii48.74Alabama15.52
Florida21.28Connecticut15.29
Maine16.26Massachusetts15.25
Georgia15.92Rhode Island15.14
North Carolina15.63New Hampshire14.81

See where your state ranks in the following chart:

StateApril rateRank (1 = cheapest)
Alabama15.5244
Alaska11.0626
Arizona14.2838
Arkansas11.0828
California13.3135
Colorado8.159
Connecticut15.2943
DC12.8733
Delaware11.6729
Florida21.2848
Georgia15.9246
Hawaii48.7449
Idaho6.842
Illinois8.4811
Indiana9.6315
Iowa8.5413
KansasNANA
Kentucky12.0130
Louisiana10.9125
Maine16.2647
Maryland14.3339
Massachusetts15.2542
Michigan8.4912
Minnesota8.078
Mississippi10.3321
Missouri10.6424
Montana6.983
Nebraska8.2810
Nevada9.9318
New Hampshire14.8140
New Jersey9.2314
New MexicoNANA
New York12.131
North Carolina15.6345
North Dakota6.621
Ohio9.917
Oklahoma10.5223
Oregon11.0627
Pennsylvania13.4136
Rhode Island15.1441
South Carolina13.8637
South Dakota7.174
Tennessee9.7716
Texas10.5122
Utah7.696
Vermont12.6532
Virginia13.1434
Washington10.1119
West Virginia10.2820
Wisconsin7.335
Wyoming7.797
U.S.10.92

The natural gas story

Most homeowners love natural gas – it’s inexpensive (in most places) and burns cleaner than coal and petroleum. Industry owners love the commodity, too. Green Energy Solutions analysts, by combing through the U.S. Energy Information Administration data for April, the most recent available, figured out the states where natural gas is cheapest and where the bulk of it is produced in the nation.

How do prices compare with the previous month?

Nationally, residential natural gas rates increased 15.2 percent from March to April. Prices went up in every state but California, where they fell 2.6 percent; New Jersey, where they dropped 1.6 percent; and Wisconsin, where they didn’t change.

Following are the 10 states where residential natural gas rates increased by the largest percentage compared with March:

StateAprilMarch% increase
Oklahoma10.527.0349.6
North Carolina15.6310.4949.0
Kentucky12.018.6339.2
Ohio9.97.4433.1
Georgia15.9212.4627.8
Indiana9.637.5427.7
Texas10.518.2527.4
Nevada9.937.8726.2
Maryland14.3311.4525.2
Missouri10.648.5524.4

Following are the 10 states where residential natural gas rates increased by the smallest percentage compared with March:

StateAprilMarch% increase
New Hampshire14.8114.661.0
Utah7.697.571.6
Florida21.2820.732.7
Maine16.2615.763.2
Massachusetts15.2514.773.2
Rhode Island15.1414.573.9
Vermont12.6511.975.7
Minnesota8.077.635.8
Alaska11.0610.396.4
Colorado8.157.67.2

Where is natural gas the cheapest for industrial users?

Prices are lowest for natural gas industrial users in Oklahoma – $2.19 per 1,000 cubic feet. The average price for the U.S. in April was $4.02. Following are the 10 states where the industrial rates were the lowest:

StateApril rateStateApril rate
Oklahoma2.19Louisiana3.41
North Dakota2.62Idaho3.60
Texas2.94Wyoming3.68
New Mexico3.06Alabama3.86
West Virginia3.21Kentucky4.03

Following are the 10 states where the industrial rates were the highest.

StateApril rateStateApril rate
Hawaii22.20Rhode Island10.02
Maine10.69New Hampshire9.29
Massachusetts10.45Pennsylvania8.63
Maryland10.42New York8.29
Delaware10.24California7.88

See industrial natural gas rates in your state for April and March, as well as the percentage increase or decrease from March:

StateAprilMarch% change
Alabama3.864.12-6.3
Alaska5.676.10-7.0
Arizona4.855.08-4.5
Arkansas6.306.61-4.7
California7.889.03-12.7
Colorado5.465.76-5.2
Connecticut7.407.52-1.6
Delaware10.249.1212.3
Florida5.496.32-13.1
Georgia4.444.50-1.3
Hawaii22.2020.856.5
Idaho3.603.64-1.1
Illinois6.14NANM
Indiana5.925.753.0
Iowa4.715.32-11.5
Kansas5.065.91-14.4
Kentucky4.033.815.8
Louisiana3.413.59-5.0
Maine10.6910.89-1.8
Maryland10.428.7618.9
Massachusetts10.4510.093.6
Michigan6.185.875.3
Minnesota4.074.46-8.7
MississippiNA5.15NM
Missouri6.166.40-3.8
Montana6.125.952.9
Nebraska4.454.235.2
Nevada5.424.8811.1
New Hampshire9.299.38-1.0
New Jersey6.867.83-12.4
New Mexico3.064.25-28.0
New York8.298.67-4.4
North Carolina5.87NANM
North Dakota2.623.26-19.6
Ohio6.226.34-1.9
Oklahoma2.192.81-22.1
Oregon4.534.87-7.0
Pennsylvania8.638.353.4
Rhode Island10.029.624.2
South Carolina4.754.85-2.1
South Dakota4.29NANM
Tennessee5.015.25-4.6
Texas2.943.03-3.0
Utah5.065.52-8.3
Vermont4.324.43-2.5
Virginia4.875.00-2.6
Washington6.506.440.9
West Virginia3.213.55-9.6
Wisconsin4.755.60-15.2
Wyoming3.683.87-4.9
US4.024.33-7.2

Where does the most U.S. natural gas originate?

The obvious answer, Texas, is the correct one. Nearly 25 percent of the nation’s natural gas comes from Texas. Following are the 16 states that produce the most natural gas in the U.S., their April production (in million cubic feet), where they ranked against one another, and the amount production changed in April compared with March:

StateApril productionRank% change
Alaska289,98031.6
Arkansas44,93112-4.1
California16,30314-2.5
Colorado162,3028-1.4
Kansas15,68115-2.3
Louisiana245,7405-5.5
Montana4,079163.0
New Mexico149,4949-2.7
North Dakota83,28311-4.0
Ohio203,1556-2.9
Oklahoma261,9824-0.8
Pennsylvania563,6012-3.3
Texas804,8041-1.5
Utah22,94813-3.6
West Virginia169,1377-1.0
Wyoming133,91110-1.1
Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico86,491-4.6
Other states40,243-1.0
US3,298,064-2.1
State% from natural gasState% from natural gas
Delaware95.4Connecticut64.5
Rhode Island90.9New Jersey60.5
Louisiana75.7Nevada57.6
Florida72.9Massachusetts55.8
Mississippi67.0Virginia53.0